About your Search

20121126
20121126
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
's supporters to pressure congress to increase taxes on the wealthy by releasing a report estimating consumers could spend dplooerl $200 billion less in 2013 if no deal is reached. joining me now live from capitol hill is luke russert. luke, what are you hearing from senators regarding this? i note that chuck todd said we should expect some to go against the pledge. it's interesting to see what the house republicans say. >> that is the whole thing, tamron. sure, you're hearing the senate talking about moving toward a bipartisan deal. you're seeing concessions by folks like saxby chambliss and other folks, however, then tire debate comes down to negotiations between president obama and house speaker boehner. specifically what can he sell to the house republican conference. they've been very stubborn in terms of moving toward any significant raising of tax rates in order to garner revenue. we heard plans that they really do see a way forward with the combination of spending cuts, closing tax loopholes. this so-called vagueness we do not know the specifics oup, they're saying, folks, support this
, clinton, and the first george bush, moved away from a position no additional taxes. they all added revenues to deficit reduction. a significant amount of revenue. >> your colleague from georgia just this week said the following about that pledge not to raise any taxes. >> you know, that pledge i signed 20 years ago was valid then. it's valid now, but times have changed significantly.Ñi and i care more about this country than i do about a 20-year-old pledge. >> it is my view that the issue of taxes is the number one stumbling block to any kind of fiscal deal. that has to be resolved first before you can get to issues like sequestration. when you hear that from a colleague, does it say to you that there is room, and does the president do anything short of raising tax rates on the wealthy? is there anything short of that acceptable? >> well, you've got to raise additional revenues, including tax rates on the wealthy. >> those have to go up? >> they have to go up. there's ways of doing that. secondly, though, we've got to close some significant loopholes. for instance, the ones which
, a new report out today showing how tax hike fears could impact consumer spending during the all-important holiday shopping season. part 2, the president's plans to take the issue straight to the voters and campaign style appearances and the use of an army of campaign volunteers to sell his message on tax hikes. the hope, that the coalition that put president obama back in office will help him ramp up the pressure on congress to make a deal. joining me now, chris van hollen and also a member of the house budget committee, congressman, good morning to you, sir. >> good morning, craig. great to be with you. >> the national journal reporting that the president could hold events related to the cliff this week. what are you hearing? >> well, i think that's right. i don't think anything has been settled. there have been on going conversations, but obviously the discussion will heat up this week now that the thanksgiving is behind us. >> what does the white house hope to accomplish with these types of events? >> well, look, this was not a side issue in the campaign. throughout the last
norquist's anti-tax pledge. saying they're open to letting revenues rise if democrats do their part in the budget talks. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece, and republicans should put revenue on the table. i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago is for that congress. for instance, if i were in congress in 1941, i would have signed the declaration of war against japan. we're not going to attack japan today. the world has changed, and the economic situation is different. >> so peter king is telling us, mike barnicle, not only is he going soft on taxes, he's going soft on japan. >> i know. >> it's not just peter king on the taxes. it's a big step, don't you think? >> it's a big step. >> grover. yeah, grover's taking a big hit since the election. there's no doubt about it. i think john, you'd verify this. number of republicans, i've talked to a couple of united states senators who
to sign a pledge from somebody else. >> what they're talking about again is tax revenue and the house speaker has talked about it. mitt romney campaigned on it. >> lowering deductions and closing loopholes. >> eliminate or limit rather deductions and credits and exemptions. cutting out the exemptions and loopholes. >> grow this economy and engage in tax reform. >> simplify the code. >> ywhen you get divorced, thats what happens. ♪ >> welcome back after the thanksgiving holiday and all eyes are on the fast approaching fiscal cliff with republicans possibly maybe looking to make a deal. with the deadline now just 36 days away, some top republicans suggest they could, shock, horror, break with their sacred pledge to grover norquist. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge i made tennesseans aware is just elected that the only thing i'm honoring is the oath that i take when i serve when i'm sworn in this january. >> there's a lot that has been said about this pledge, and i will tell you when i go to the constituents that have elected -- re-elected me, it is not about that pledge. it really i
bipartisan consensus to raise taxes on the wealthy, the sides are still far apart on where the revenue will come from. staff level negotiations are a little bit more than stalled. not fully stalled but they didn't go so great last week and it's unclear where speaker boehner will get the votes for a deal that would raise tax rates. which is why he's pushing against that idea. two senate republicans up for re-election in 2014 have bucked norquist saying they are willing to let taxes ride. chambliss spoke to his hometown station. >> that pledge i signed 20 years ago was valid then. it's valid now, but times have changed significantly. and i care more about this country than i do about a 20-year-old pledge. >> on sunday south carolina senator lindsey graham also broke ranks saying the norquist pledge can no longer be a conservative litmus test. >> when you're $16 trillion in it debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece. but i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country only if it democrats will do entitlement reform. >> b
sure raising taxes on the wealthy is part of the deal. politico is calling them cliff jumpers. l good morning to both of you. >> good morning. >> let me play a couple of clips to start out about the pledge. >> i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> a pledge you sign 20 years ago, 18 years ago, is for that congress. if i were in congress in 1841 i would have supported declaration of war against japan. i won't attack japan today. the world changed and the economic situation is different. >> i am not oblg gate on the pledge. i was just elected. the only thing i am honoring is the oath that i take when i serve when i am sworn in in january. >> chambliss already made a similar statement last week. the question is is this a real softening of positions? does it give them room to make deal. >> two things. first, let's look at the real room being created. so far i haven't heard anyone say i am willing to raise marginal tax rates as part of a deal. they're arguing with the head of the antitax coalition about whet
the economic recovery. obama's plan includes lower taxes on the first $250,000 earned by every american and tweaking the alternative minimum tax. the white house report estimates that consumer spending would fall by $200 million. now that's more than three times what consumers spent just over this entire holiday weekend. there could be a drag on a range of industries from cars and housing to restaurants and supermarkets, if congress can't reach a deal. and look, pocketbook issues are not the only problem here. carl levin, the democratic senator and chair of the armed services committee said automatic cuts to government spending could impact public safety. >> i think you should be worried if you have a defense job and we all ought to be worried whether we are dependent upon other aspects of the federal budget. whether we're worried about the regulation of our food safety, whether we're worried about our borders being secure, whether we're worried about fbi being supported, it's all affected by sequestration. >> joining me now, cnbc washington reporter eamon javers. you heard the numbers
putting limits on their no tax pledge and telling grover norquist to get lost. but remember, there's only one of those people in the houpts. >>> keeping home and change alive. president obama's aits are hoping to keep the campaign going and use their new leverage at the polls to bin the fight for higher taxes against the wealthy. >>> this is "hardball," the place for politics. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> get ready for some more partisan agendas in the state governments across the country. that's because some january at least 37 states will be under single party control. 37 of them. with one party holding both houses of state legislatures and the governorship. and that's the largest number of states under single part
grover norquist, condemning his pledge never to raise taxes. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece and republicans should put revenue on the table. >> how's that for a profiling courage? senator graham is standing up to a pledge he made to an unelected official in charge of a group that most americans never heard of. a pledge that's 26 years old. but at least graham is voting to raise taxes on the wealthy. right? wrong. >> raises tax rates will hurt job creation so i agree with grover we should not raise rates. i will violate for the good of the country only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> so he won't raise tax rates and entitlements need to be gutted. but that's more like it. let's see some more brave talk from the gop. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge. there's a menu of options on the revenue side and on the entitlement side and as long as there are two parties that are willing to solve this problem, this is a very easy thing to do technically. what it takes is political courage. >> guess
more in taxes next year, coupled with $100 billion in cuts to domestic and defense spending. now, since the reagan era, most republicans have pledged not to raise taxes. as mike viqueira reports, there are signs of flexibility on both sides of the aisle. >> reporter: it's a pledge almost all republicans have signed. to oppose tax increases of any kind. that once solid wall was showing crass. >> the pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago is for that congress. the world has changed, and the economic situation is different. >> reporter: but republicans insist in return for defying party doctrine, democrats must agree that changes in social security and medicare. >> i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> reporter: activists on the left are lining up to oppose those reforms, but the president has put them on the table before. during last year's failed talks on a grand bargain and more recently in his first post-election press conference. >> we have to continue to take a serious look at how we reform our
small business tax hikes. got to love that one. meantime democrats continue to announce tax hikes. tomorrow senator dick durbin will bill what's major address to lay out the progressive case for a bipartisan deal and later this week the second white house meeting with meetings from both sides of the aisle. joining us is our post tag team bill russert and bloomberg's stephanie ruhle. she rules. unwrap that for us, brother. >> well, they would say the good news is that there has been some movement from senate republicans on the issue of raising taxes. lindsey graham, saxby chambless talking about a tax revenue. medicare, medicaid, perhaps we could have some meaningful entitlement reform. that's the good news, that there seems to be this idea that we can work out a big partisan deal. we both know taxes going up. entitlement, benefits going down. however, when we get into the bad news is that while this is all fine and dandy coming out of the cincinnati, toure. the real negotiations are going to happen between president obama and house speaker john boehner. it's a lot different animal
mitchell live in washington. congress is back. grover norquist's tax pledge could be history. and all eyes are now focusing on house republicans as talks to avoid going over that so-called fiscal cliff are picking up steam. joining me now, mark halperin, senior political analyst for "time" and msnbc and ruth marcus, columnist and editorial writer for the "washington post." to you, mark, what is your read about what we've been hearing the last couple of days about grover norquist, the pledge and how much running room the speaker does have to b negotiating a deal. >> i did a spit take with my fruity pebbles watching "morning joe" because eric cantor's tone was unlike anything i've ever heard. his office is saying oh, no, he's against raising marginal rates, but it's clear that in the scheme of things, the biggest piece is does john boehner have enough running room to strike a deal involving some new revenue. i still am of the belief that the vote in the house, which will be a cliff hanger no matter what happens amongst the leaders in the white house, it will be a tough vote. i think it will
billion in tax increases and spending cuts. >>> because he watches "morning joe" every weekday morning -- >> i don't think that's true. maybe. >> -- monday through friday, senator john mccain is taking our advice and softening his attacks on susan rice. after vowing to block her potential nomination as secretary of state. now, republicans are claiming the ambassador deliberately misled the country in the aftermath of the september 11th attacks on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. but rice says she's not to blame, arguing that she relied on talking points from the intelligence community. now, although senator mccain had threatened a senate filibuster earlier this month, he says he's now open to meeting directly with ms. rice. >> is there anything that ambassador rice can do to change your mind about it? >> sure. she can give everyone the benefit of explaining their position and the actions that they took, and i'll be glad to have the opportunity to discuss these issues with her. >> she could conceivably get your vote for secretary of state? >> i think she deserves the ability and the oppo
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)